Attach oligos to ligands or surfaces

Dithiol modifier

Product spotlight: Thiol-modified oligonucleotides are used in attachment chemistry reactions to bind an oligo to a target. Targets are commonly gold molecules, but can also include a variety of fluorescent and nonfluorescent moieties.

Quick Facts

Availability: DNA or RNA Location: 5’, 3’, or internally (shown)
Scales: 100 nmole to large scale
Purification: HPLC required
Symbol for ordering: /5DTPA/, /iDTPA/, /3DTPA/

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Figure 1. Dithiol modifier.



Thiol-modified oligonucleotides are used in attachment chemistry reactions to bind an oligo to a target. Targets are commonly gold, but can also include a variety of fluorescent and nonfluorescent moieties. The Dithiol modifier adds two functionalized thiol (SH) groups, increasing its target binding efficiency when compared to the conventional Thiol modifier. An additional Dithiol can be added for even greater binding efficiency.

Both Thiol- and Dithiol-modified oligonucleotides are shipped in their oxidized (disulfide) states and require reduction by Dithiothreitol (DTT) or Tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (TCEP) prior to use. To order, select Dithiol from the 5’ mods, Internal mods, or 3’ mods tab on the oligo order page. Please note this modification requires HPLC purification.

Other modifications to facilitate your research

See what other modifications are available from IDT. You can find a list of standard modifications we make to oligonucleotides on the Modifications page of our online catalog. And if you don’t find what you are looking for, just send us a request. We often synthesize special, non-catalog requests. Contact us at noncat@idtdna.com.

Published Jun 17, 2011

Disclaimer: Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and derived products (Chemical Products) are for research purposes only, and may not be used for commercial, clinical, diagnostic or any other use. These products or portions thereof are subject to proprietary rights of FRIZ Biochem Gesellschaft für Bioanalytik mbH. Patents Pending.
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